Recent Work


As the details of an event fade, very often the emotional residue strengthens with the passage of time and gives meaning to my work.

 

I realised this whilst walking the Severn this year, finding myself in situations I had not experienced before;  sleeping rough on Plynlimon in January, when the temperature dropped to minus eight, is certainly etched

into my memory.

I have never been encumbered by the constraints of a single style but enjoy the freedom to explore different approaches and techniques. Learning to use a graphics tablet and experimenting with various apps has evolved from sketching on my smartphone. Exploring colour and texture, from an aerial perspective with acrylics, occured to me whilst studying guidebooks and maps.

No matter what the technique or approach, however, it is always a passion for my lifelong friend, the River Severn, which is at the heart of my paintings.

 

All work you see here is on display at Ironbridge Fine Arts from 1st December. Please contact the gallery to enquire.

An Old Friend. I ventured up Plynlimon, source of the Severn, last January in appalling weather; the solitude and failing light only adding to the experience. Despite this and the prospect of spending a night on the mountain, I was with my old friend.

Watercolour, coloured pencil and acrylic ink on paper. 330 x 330mm.

Walking the Dog. The two trees in this composition represent a lovely lady and her dog who I met whilst sketching at Caersws. She had lived by the river for fifty years where her late husband had taught there children to swim.

Watercolour and coloured pencil on paper. 745 x 185mm.

Twighlight Bivouac. Sleeping rough by the river may not be for everyone but for me it offers opportunities, like this, to live and breathe the calm that comes with twilight.

Watercolour and coloured pencil on paper. 330 x 330mm.

Cheese and Pickle Again. This was my first thought when I saw these two Severn estuary anglers one Saturday lunchtime.

When I stop to sketch a subject, my first thought often becomes the title.

Watercolour and coloured pencil on paper. 330 x 330mm

Approaching the Shropshire Border. The river, livestock and a stunning spring morning were all the ingredients I needed to create this quintessential scene near Crew Green.

Watercolour and coloured pencil on paper. 330 x 330mm.

The Mustard Jumper. The memory of the mustard jumper my Nan knitted to keep me warm whilst winter fishing was the inspiration behind this painting.

Watercolour, coloured pencil and acrylic ink on paper. 325 x 200mm.

Morning Flight. Here, above the Severn Bridge, I wanted to create an intriguing contrast between the people in the air and those on the ground.

Original, digital painting on canvas. 300x x300mm

Ironbridge Westerlies. I spend so much time looking up at these chimneys that I thought it was time to look the other way.

Original, digital painting on canvas. 300 x 300mm

Winter Haven. I am very fond of Ironbridge and often sense the protective embrace of the valley on those who live and work in this historic place.

Original, digital painting on canvas. 300 x 300mm.

New Moon. Inspired by a night spent on the riverbank near Llanidloes.

Original, digital painting on canvas. 300 x 300mm

After the Bore. I enjoy the anticipation and excitement shared by all the spectators who watch the Severn Bore. I usually stay for a while after it has subsided, when most of them have gone home, to observe the landscape slowly reappearing.

Acrylic with satin varnish on canvas. 410 x 410mm

Hoar Frost at Dawn. There's something magical about waking up to a hoar frost, especially at dawn. This painting is based on my memory of December 2010.

Acrylic with satin varnish on canvas. 410 x 410mm.

Meltwater. Like so many people who live by the river I have witnessed and been affected by floods all my life. Here the thawing snow feeds more water into the river which brings life for many to a standstill.

Acrylic with satin varnish on canvas. 410 x 410mm.

March Greens. I love the restrained, late winter greens and changeable light over welsh landscape, especially where they accompany the river.

Acrylic with satin varnish on canvas. 1000 x 310mm.

 

Spring Flurry. A snow shower captured in colour and texture whilst there was brilliant, clear light on the landscape, thawing as soon as it touched the ground.

Acrylic with satin varnish on canvas. 410 x 310mm.

 

Summer Wanes. Here, I wanted to evoke the colours and rhythms of the river during late summer.

Acrylic with satin varnish on canvas. 410 x 310mm.

 

Waterlogged. Just before a flood there is a moment when the water slowly begins to saturate the landscape. I have experienced this on many occasions whilst being engrossed in a painting and suddenly found myself with wet feet!

Acrylic with satin varnish on canvas. 410 x 310mm.

Ebb and Flow. Clevedon Pill. I can spend all day walking the estuary but the magic so often happens in a brief moment at sunset; one of the joys of painting on-site.

Acrylic with satin varnish on board. 205 x 155mm.

 

Handmade, Manmade. I could have easily walked past this subject but I was curious enough to explore the contrast between two very different structures.

Acrylic with satin varnish on board. 205 x 155mm.

An Ebbing Tide Marked the End of Summer. I painted this on-site, just below Sharpness, on a day where the afternoon closed in and I could smell autumn in the air.

Acrylic with satin varnish on board. 205 x 155mm.